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Exhibitions Available for Touring

The Ewing Gallery of Art and Architecture has a number of exhibitions available for tour to other venues. If you are interested in hosting one of these exhibitions at your gallery, please send an email inquiry to ewing@utk.edu for more information.

Life in the City: The Art of Joseph Delaney
Life in the City showcases Joseph Delaney’s mastery of a wide variety of media, including oil paintings, pen and ink drawings, charcoal sketches, and pastel portraits and watercolors. The exhibition explores Joseph’s love for the urban environment and his interest in depicting the human figure as participant within the built environment of New York City.

Joseph Delaney was born in Knoxville in 1904. He and his older brother, Beauford, discovered their interest in art by drawing on Sunday School cards. In 1930, Joseph left Tennessee for New York where Beauford was also working as an artist, and enrolled in the Art Students League under the tutelage of Thomas Hart Benton and Alexander Brooke. The subject matter he found there, including the city’s landmarks and its people, are the images for which he is best known. In 1986, Delaney returned to Knoxville to live and was artist-in-residence for the University of Tennessee Art Department until his death in 1991. Delaney’s works are included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Chicago Art Institute, The Knoxville Museum of Art, and The Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Life in the City includes 72 framed paintings and works on paper from the permanent collection of the Ewing Gallery of Art + Architecture.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

Civil War Series

Richard J. LeFevre’s Civil War Series presents the history of the United States Civil War (1861 – 1865) through works on paper that depict 32 of the war’s most significant battles. By combining his love of history and his skill as an illustrator, LeFevre used inventive mixed-media techniques to create these powerful images inspired by his personal investigation into that terrible and definitive era.

He sought to authenticate the audience experience by incorporating images from period publications such as Harper’s Weekly and Leslie’s Illustrated. Century-old woodcut engravings, made from sketches by Civil War artists who were present at the battles, were flash-framed onto paper with a copier and then manipulated with watercolor, pencil, and collage techniques.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

Salvador Dali: The Divine Comedy

From 1951-1960, the artist Salvador Dali worked to complete a suite of watercolors illustrating Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy to celebrate the 700th birthday of the Italian poet. Later, master printers would work to generate wood blocks to reproduce and publish Dali’s original paintings.

This is the complete series of Dali’s 100 prints illustrating Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

Through the Lens of Ed Westcott: A Photographic History of World War II’s Secret City

In 1942, the Army Corps of Engineers relocated James Edward Westcott to Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and assigned him the task of official photographer for the Manhattan Project – a massive wartime effort to produce the first atomic bomb. As secrecy of the project was paramount, the “atomic” city was fenced, and communication with the outside world was limited. What is more, no cameras were allowed inside its boundaries.

Thus, Westcott became not only the official photographer for the Manhattan Project, but he also became the sole photographer of the social and recreational events of Oak Ridge. It is only through Westcott’s photographs that the visual history of Oak Ridge can be appreciated.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

The Golden Age of American Illustration: Walter Haskell Hinton

Walter Haskell Hinton (1886-1980) was an American Illustrator during the “Golden Age” of illustration from about 1910 through the 1940s. Over the course of his career, Hinton generated ad images for The Saturday Evening Post, John Deere, Fairmont Railways, Washington National Insurance Company, Austin-Western, and Orange Crush soda. He also created the cover images for many issues of Outdoor Life, Sports Afield, and Western pulp magazines. This exhibition focuses on his work-in-progress watercolor illustrations for these popular magazine covers.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

American Abstract Artists Digital Portfolios

The 75th Anniversary American Abstract Artists Print Portfolio, a exhibition consisting of 48 archival digital prints. AAA published its first portfolio in 1937. It consisted of 30 lithographs and, in lieu of a catalog, accompanied the group’s first exhibition, which was held at the Squibb Gallery in New York City. In addition to that first portfolio and this 75th Anniversary portfolio, only two others have been published—one commemorating the organization’s 50th anniversary, and one for the 60th. All prints are 9.75″ x 12.75″

In 2019, partly as an addendum to the 2012 portfolio exhibition, for exhibition purposes, and as an opportunity to showcase the work of recent AAA members (as well as earlier members who did not participate in the 2012 portfolio), American Abstract Artists published the 2019 Monoprint Portfolio. It is made up of twenty-five prints, one per artist, sized at 9.75 x 12.75 inches, horizontally, or 12.75 x 9.75, vertically.

Click here to view the 75th Anniversary Print Portfolio.

Click here to view the 2019 Monoprint Portfolio.

Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer: Norman Rockwell

This small exhibition includes 16 framed lithographs from the permanent collection of the Ewing Gallery. These prints were produced in the 1970s, and were based on original illustrations by Norman Rockwell  for the 1935 editions of Tom Sawyer  and Huckleberry Finn, released by Heritage Press and Limited Editions Club Books.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

Images of Human Rights

The South African Bill of Rights was born out of a long struggle against racial segregation and human rights violations. Until the first democratic election in 1994, the majority of South Africans had been excluded from participating in the political process. Talks in the early 1990s between political prisoner Nelson Mandela and then South African leader F.W. De Klerk ultimately led to free elections and a new government which aimed to respect the rights of all its citizens. Images of Human Rights features 29 prints, created by artists representing the nine provinces of South Africa. The portfolio was  printed by master printmaker Jan Jordaan. The print portfolio was conceived of and released in 1996 by the Images of Human Rights Portfolio Committee.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

El Color De La Diaspora

This exhibition of 41 black and white photographs is drawn from the collections of the Fondo Documental Afro-Andino and the Universidad Andina Simon Bolivar. El Color de la Diaspora: Afro-Ecuadorian Images endeavors to show, in visual form, elements of the lived Diaspora among Black peoples in Ecuador and match them with collected oral testimonies. Through the presentation of the black and white photographs taken over a 30-year period in the regions of Esmeraldas and the Chota Valley by two Afro-Ecuadorian photographers — Juan Garcia and Edizon Leon, both of who are from the communities represented — the exhibit offers a shift in focus.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men: Walker Evans Photographs

Walker Evans’ photographs made for James Agee’s classic work, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, served as the culmination of Evans’ talents as well as the realistic portrayal of the conditions of the American tenant farmer during the 1930s. Walker Evans’ images revolutionized the standards of documentary photography.

This exhibition includes 50 framed photographs printed by the Library of Congress from Evans’ original negatives.

Click here to view selected works from the exhibition.